Report on Summer Science Camp 2013

The euphoria of camp wears off quickly, but fortunately, almost magically (perhaps for the rest of our lives), anytime we wish we can close our eyes and instantly our minds flash through the images and sounds that make up our memories of camp. We smile, and for a moment, the euphoria returns.

23 Campers, 4 Staff, 2 10-day sessions, 21 Field Trips, 50/50 Girls/Boys, 50/50 Hawaii/Mainland, 1200 miles per session, 15 average age, 17 lava encounters, 3 pickup basketball games, 27 Rings of Saturn sightings

Our first Science Camp was held this summer on the Big Island of Hawaii and was very successful (more on that later). Here are some numbers from camp:

We had two great groups of good, smart, friendly kids which really made it possible for everyone, campers and staff, to have a great time and to achieve what we set out to do.

Land & Sea Science Camp group photo

Land & Sea Science Camp

Of course, calling something a success doesn’t make it so. You have to have criteria for the claim. Here is ours:

  • No one was lost or seriously hurt (seems basic, but you have to pay attention!)
  • Everyone was housed and fed (it was surprising how important this became!)
  • Campers had fun and bonded closely with each other (per surveys and interviews)
  • Everyone learned a lot of science (without homework or classes!)
  • Met or exceeded our science programming goals

Most importantly, we proved that an overnight camp can be a fantastic environment for teens to learn science in a hands-on, experiential way. One of the reasons I feel confident declaring camp a success is that at the end of each session, no one wanted to leave! The last day was very emotional: many tears, hugs, and sad good-byes. At once, everyone was suddenly realizing what a fantastic experience it had been and that, sadly, it was ending.

Air & Space Science Camp Group Picture

Air & Space Science Camp

I want to thank a number of people for their help in making Science Camp a success: our staff, Patty Halpin, science teacher and Toni Difante, counselor for their hard work, patience and for creating a fun, open and comfortable camp environment;  Julia Neal, Pahala Plantation Cottages, for taking such good care of us every day; The Edmund C. Olson Trust and Mrs. Zora Charles for the scholarships they provided; the many Big Island organizations and individuals that allowed us to visit; members of the Science Camps of America Board of Directors and Board of Advisors for their help and guidance in making camp a reality. Special thanks are added for my wife Sheri, who was officially the camp nurse, but unofficially just about everything else, and without whom, this camp would not have been possible.

Patty

Patty

Sheri

Sheri

Toni

Toni

Beyond Traditional Learning

To build long-lasting connections with the science we are learning each day, we have included activities at Science Camp that enrich the total experience.  Here is a look at how we are doing that.

Enrichment through Hawaiian Culture

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Through Hawaiian language, art, culture, dance, music and history, our intent is to better understand the threads that link us to the past and to the future in this place. Many of the issues we face today – energy, sustainability, climate change, natural hazards, sea level change – were just as critical to the Hawaiians of old. Understanding the approach an island people used to deal with these issues can be related to finding the ways that our ‘island’ planet will do the same.

Enrichment through the Arts

Enrichment through the ArtsUsing photography, videography, art, drawing, music and dance is a powerful way to deepen the understanding of the environmental science that our campers will be studying. Visiting a volcano is a great learning experience, but how does it make you feel?  How can you share with others how you felt while hearing the harrowing story of a tsunami survivor? How does a photographer capture a feeling? We want our campers to find ways to express themselves and to share those expressions with others.  Our specialists will be helping our young scientists learn.

Enrichment through Nature

Enrichment through NatureAs human beings we are wired to connect with nature. Study after study shows that being outdoors is a benefit, no matter what activity it is. At camp we will almost always be outside.  What recharges you? Is it the beach? the ocean? walking through the forest? hiking in the desert? The Big Island offers so much variety, including volcanoes, mountains, forests, deserts and beaches, that we are going to have continuous chances to connect and re-connect with the great outdoors.

Enrichment through Camp Life

Enrichment through Camp LifeAttending camp has so many benefits for the intangibles that are so critical today: leadership, confidence, teamwork, to learn to fail and to try again, to help others, to expand one’s horizons.  These are what are called ’21st century skills’ but camps have been teaching these skills since the 1860’s. And, naturally, making new friends, exploring new places and having fun.

Here is how it comes together…

5 StepsWe hike from camp to the shoreline through a wild coastal plain of old lava flows, scrub brush and lowland forest. As we walk, we learn about the plants we are seeing, the climate that allows this environment, and the forces that created this coastline. When we reach the ancient Hawaiian trail known as The King’s Trail, we learn about what we are seeing and hear tales of myth and history as we continue our hike along the coast.  We find a remote cove where we can stop and have lunch, take videos and pictures or draw, study the topography of the land. We talk about explosive volcanism and what we are seeing around us, and then we look for and measure evidence of changes in sea level in the past. After hiking back, we work together to assemble a multimedia video about the day, including video clips, photos, music and voice-overs.  Before turning in for the night, we post the video on the Science Camp community website so our families and friends can log in and see what we did today.
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Learn more at ScienceCampsAmerica.com.

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Courtesy of Ka’u Preservation

Conservation in Ka’u

Recently I was able to attend an ‘After Dark in the Park‘ event at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. The speaker that evening was John Replogle of The Nature Conservancy’s Ka’u Preserve. The Ka’u Preserve is a very close neighbor to  Science Camp, and we are working on plans to include programs at the Ka’u Preserve this summer.

Ka'u Preserve

The Ka’u Preserve consists of four parcels of land adjacent to the Ka’u Forest Preserve, which is State-owned forest reserve lands. The Ka’u forest is the largest and most intact native forest in Hawaii. Many rare plants and birds still survive in this forest. The forest itself features ‘ōhi‘a and koa trees which provide a canopy for the lush native understory.

In his presentation, Mr. Replogle presented the goals of TNC (The Nature Conservancy) in the Ka’u Preserve, and discussed the various programs they are carrying out to achieve those goals.

Most of TNC’s efforts are focused on controlling feral animals and invasive plant species. Controlling the pigs and goats that are the forest’s biggest threat consists mostly of the very difficult work of putting up fencing through very dense forest undergrowth.

Once fences are in place, though, the effect is dramatic, as these images illustrate:

understory fence

This image illustrates how quickly the forest can recover once feral pigs have been fenced out.

This image, from the island of Molokai, shows the effect of a fence built to keep feral goats out.

This image shows the effect of a fence built to keep out feral goats on Molokai.

kamehame-nature-conservancy

Also just a short distance from camp is Kamekame Beach. TNC purchased this land in 2002 in order to protect the endangered Hawksbill Turtle (hanu`ea) for whom this beach is the single most important nesting site in the U.S.  Together with the National Park Service and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, TNC operates a volunteer turtle monitoring program to protect the nests from invasive predators such as rats and mongooses.

hawksbill_turtle

At Science Camp this summer, campers will have the chance to learn first-hand about the plants and animals that make up these habitats, about the methods used to protect them, about the scientists, environmentalists, naturalists, and volunteers who do this important work, and to participate in that work.

Registration for Science Camp is Open!

We are officially open! The Science Camps of America web site is now up and ready to help campers, parents and anyone who would like to help send teens to science camp. Take a look at http://ScienceCampsAmerica.com.

Science Camp Web Site

Science Camp will be held on the Big Island of Hawaii. The first session, Land and Sea, is from June 22-July 1, the second, Air and Space is from July 1-10. The camp will be hosted at Pahala Plantation Cottages. We have space for about 36 teens each session.

Here is some of what you can do on  the web site:

* Learn about our summer science camps for teens
* Register for camp
* Make a donation (thank you!)
* Apply for a job or volunteer
* Contact us about becoming a sponsor
* Learn how you can offer a scholarship
* Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and WordPress
* Enjoy the pictures
* Connect to this blog

 

A Day at Science Camp

What is a typical day at science camp like? Here is a sample:

7:00 am: Wake up shortly after sunrise, go outside and spend a few minutes enjoying the sunshine. Pahala Plantation House

7:30 am: Off to breakfast – short five minute walk to the ‘Plantation House’ – banana pancakes on the veranda – yum!

8:30 am: Back to the cottage for clean up and to pack for today’s filed trip, Kilauea Volcano.

9:30 am: Gather at the vans, pile in – here we go!Kilauea Lookout

10:00 am: Arrive at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. The resident geologist gives us a presentation about the facility and its history and talks about what they do at the observatory, including what they do when the volcano does something spectacular. On to the Jaggar Museum to spend some time at the lookout over Kilauea Caldera.Thurston Lava Tube

Noon: After eating lunch in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, we are walking through Thurston Lava Tube, learning how important lava tubes are to a Hawaiian-type volcano. Amazing to walk through one!

2:00 pm: Hiking the Ka’u Desert Trail.  What a weird place. Saw footprints more than 200 years old preserved in ash. Kilauea Caldera

4:00 pm: Back at camp. This is rec hour. One of the counselors is really good at photography and today she’s taking a group of us out on a photography walk.

5:30 pm: Kitchen Duty today, so I’m at the Plantation House early.

7:30 pm: Showing a film about Kilauea eruptions between 1955 and 1960. Those old guys took some chances!

_MG_7078s8:00 pm: Surprise trip up to Kilauea volcano. Standing at the lookout watching the glow coming from Halema’uma’u Crater. Awesome! And the night sky is incredible.

Big Island Star Gazing

10:00 pm: Lights out!

What do YOU Dream of?

DocGraham

When this blog was started along with our dream of opening Science Camps of America fifteen months ago, the byline posted at the top of this page was “If you build it, they will come.” I wrote about this at that time (Field of Dreams and Our Temporary Byline).

Today, that byline was changed to our new motto: “What do YOU dream of?”

What do YOU dream of?

Our goal is to nurture our campers’ existing dreams, and trigger new dreams. Campers will discover new directions, imagine new ideas, and uncover new possibilities. Dreams can come true, but they need help: knowledge, hard work, and most of all, the help of others.  At Science Camps of America, we will strive to do whatever we can to help our campers’ dreams take flight.

“The biggest adventure you can take is to live the life of your dreams.”

 – Oprah Winfrey

Share your dreams with us:

Something About Lava

Kilauea volcano, on the island of Hawaii, will mark 30 continuous years of eruption next month. It has been a relatively gentle eruption that has made it easy to study in relative safety. This week, I was able to join a group and hike out to where the lava flows into the ocean. The hike, over bumpy frozen lava, was 2½ miles (4 km) and took about 2 hours each way; we stayed out at the point where the lava flowed into the ocean for about an hour before hiking back.

It was incredible! We were able to get right up to the lava, but it was hot! After just a few seconds, we had to back away a a few feet. And you have to poke a stick in it! Best of all was watching the lava flow into the ocean. Sometimes, pieces of lava fall into the ocean and you watch them float out to sea while they are still burning.

There is something about lava that reaches deep inside. It feels like a link to the creation of the world; a reminder that change is a constant.

This link is to a video I created of the experience. On a side note, this video (my first) is also my final ‘exam’ for the Photoshop class I am taking at the University of Hawaii Windward campus.

At Science Camps of America this June, we hope a hike to see the lava will be a part of Science Camp; however, we won’t know if we will be able to do so until it is time for camp, as conditions are constantly changing.

It was an amazing experience – if you ever are on the Big Island and have the chance, don’t miss it!

FollowMarkedTrail_HDR2

The trail is now a bit harder to follow.

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Pahoehoe lava ‘toe’

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Watching the island grow.

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Yes, I pretty much could not stop smiling!